Could we, per chance, justify another Spanish civil war, if it, like the last one, yielded another The Fifth Column – or yet a Guernica?

I really wouldn’t know, but something good should come out of this.

In any event, the conduct of generalissimo Francisco Franco’s good old La Guardia Civil, has been a proper disgrace.

So shame on you, Spain.

Estelada blava. The Catalan flag katalonsk flagg Catalonia Katalonia

Top photo: Pablo Picasso’s Guernica, 1937. Oil on canvas, 776.6 x 349.3 centimetres. Catalan flag, the Estelada blava: Blogger’s own drawing.

Elvis Presley: Viva Las Vegas

While an avid supporter of unity over fragmentation, I also favour democracy over fascitoid regimes.

Enough said, I think.

Incidentally, if a Saudi female driver should happen to run into a car driven by a male …

When extremism changes our view of normalcy

Most people weren’t surprised by yesterday’s Alternative für Deutschland landslide election, perhaps because we long since allowed extreme views in our own governing bodies, to such an extent that their views increasingly become our own, seen as the standard to which we’re all held.

Seen in light of this, Americans supporting a proto-fascist’s U.S. presidency, or Norwegians, securing another four years of xenophobic rule, should of course not be surprised by a German 12.6 percent AfD support. We should, however, be surprised that extreme views no longer surprise us. Maybe because “they” are now “us”.

The German election received significant news coverage yesterday, as it should, regardless the outcome – granted with some attention to the extremist advance, although few bothered to raise an eyebrow (which is my real concern here).

The term “white shirts” is about to establish itself as descriptive of the white-shirt-clad neo-Nazi Nordic Resistance Movement, whose marching no longer affects or concerns us, lulled into the impression that it’s all as it should be, rendering even authorities on extremism fairly indifferent to their success.

Why?

Perhaps because said Nazis do not define themselves Nazi, and after all, we have to take their word for it, no?

No.

In any event yesterday’s extremism is seen as today’s state of normalcy, and it should scare the living daylight out of us. Unfortunately, brought to a state of indifference, it does not. Furthermore and off the top of my head, I can think of only two groups rejecting the Nazi term used on modern-day Nazis: The moderate voices advocating dialogue over condemnation – and the Nazis themselves.

As mentioned in this blog on many an occasion, we often ask ourselves how the interwar Germans could possibly allow Adolf Hitler’s rise to power.

Really? I mean, really?

Photo: White shirts marching in Sweden (and increasingly, hardly noticeable, in our very own streets).

Elton John: Rocket Man

Would it be fair to say that it’s hard to find better theme music for the The Donald v Li’l Kim controversies these days?

For the American dreamers

West Side Story (1961): America.

Cher & David Bowie: Young Americans.

OK, so I know I posted this back in February, but you know … All things considered.

And in case you wondered. Yes:

Gott mit uns
German military belt-buckle of WW2, with old Prussian GOTT MIT UNS slogan. Photographer: StromBer/Wikimedia Commons.

Top image: Blogger’s illustration.

Reciprocation is terrorism, too

Last night’s attack on a Finsbury Park Mosque would appear to be an act of retaliation, but make no mistake about it: Any action carried out as an act of revenge is every bit as terroristic as the act it was intended to retaliate, although I notice how easily I’m provoked by muslims using the incident as proof that Christians/European/white people are every bit as bad as Isil.

Having said that, retaliation is not the way to go about this. Au contraire it is exactly what the terrorists want: An all out clash of civilisations (as pointed out on numerous occasions).

The situation calls for calm composure, even if chances are we’ll have just the opposite.