Reciprocation is terrorism, too

Last night’s attack on a Finsbury Park Mosque would appear to be an act of retaliation, but make no mistake about it: Any action carried out as an act of revenge is every bit as terroristic as the act it was intended to retaliate, although I notice how easily I’m provoked by muslims using the incident as proof that Christians/European/white people are every bit as bad as Isil.

Having said that, retaliation is not the way to go about this. Au contraire it is exactly what the terrorists want: An all out clash of civilisations (as pointed out on numerous occasions).

The situation calls for calm composure, even if chances are we’ll have just the opposite.

Hard BreXXXit, 2017

Entertaining, I’m sure, if not necessarily arousing.

Hope you’ll have an excellent weekend!

A Britain divided once again normally wouldn’t call for celebration. Nevertheless, in honour of Jeremy Corbyn’s impressive gain, I thought it only befitting to rustle up a fry-up, full monty, save the sausages (I’d have to go to Marks & Spencer in Oslo in order to get hold of such bare necessities, and I live nowhere near that, as you may well know), and, of course, a cuppa – reminiscing the days of Ted Heath and Harold Wilson, now that the two-party system seems safely reinstated.

I will not, however, attempt to deliver an in-depth analysis of the UK post Brexit chaos, now that the Brits have made themselves utterly irrelevant.

P.S. According to the wife it’s salad for me tonight.

Western tolerance a red rag to the ISIL bull?

On a day like today our thoughts and potential prayers go to the British people, in the aftermath of last night’s terrible attack – the third within just as many months, leaving us blindsided and appalled, while ISIL calls for an “all-out war” during Ramadan.

You have to admire the Brits’ phlegmatic approach, as illustrated by the iconic WW2 poster:

Keep calm and carry on

Admirable as the attitude may be, it would appear that it has done little to prevent terrorist attacks. Judging by the increase in incidents, on the contrary.

My deepest fear has been that it would some day come to this, as mentioned in a June 2016 blog post; Clash of civilisations in full bloom? The problem, of course, is as follows:

ISIL’s declared intention is to create a divide, a state of war between the Muslim world and the west, a strategy which has failed completely, due to our continued tolerance of Islam and the Arab world, seriously pissing ISIL off, and motivating an increase in the terrorist organisation’s attacks, of course.

Finding myself the uncle of two adorable Muslim kids, mobilising hate against the Muslim community is, of course, an impossibility. Would be, even if it wasn’t for my sweet Muslim nephew and niece.

Having said that, I remain fearful that our failure to consider the outcome of ISIL’s war declaration a western war on Islam, rather than a war on ISIL itself, will only serve to intensify the terrorists’ efforts.

If we’re to preserve our last remnants of human decency, though, it all boils down to a damned if we do, damned if we don’t.

Human decency, however, has my vote – even if it will inevitably lead to more terrorist attacks.

Luckily that is a decision I make on my own behalf only.

Top illustration: Islam critic and muslim. Blogger’s drawing.

Captain SKA: Liar Liar GE2017

Devastating news from the Manchester Arena.

When domestic politics fail: Go to war

I hate to say “I hate to say I told you so, but I told you so”, which is why I’m very pleased to say that for once my predictions weren’t altogether accurate.

Avid readers may remember how I, in a late December 2016 blog post, appointed the Middle East the new East–West battlefield. Turned out that I was indeed right, but what I failed to see, was the escalation of the Southeast Asian conflict now materialising in North Korea’s armament and the U.S. Navy’s race towards the Korean peninsula’s shores.

The Middle East Midtøsten

Make no mistake about it: We may think the Middle East resembled hell on earth, but I fear we haven’t seen the half of it. With Southeast Asian conflicts on the rise, on top of Russia’s aggressive stance on neighbouring countries, such as Ukraine, it’s safe to say that it’s been some time since we were this close to a potential world war 3, hard as it is to imagine.

Of course it’s all to do with both Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin’s lack of success in domestic affairs and their need to show international force, coupled with fellow madman Kim Jong-un’s megalomaniacal delusions.

Kim Jong-un og Malaysia Airlines
Kim Jong-un and Malaysia Airlines aircraft. Blogger’s manipulation.

While I hate to admit failing to see this development in advance, there’s no denying it’s currently playing out right under our noses, and I, for one, am scared shitless.

But it doesn’t stop there: With Brexit underway, and Spain and the UK fighting over Gibraltar, Europe’s stability is at risk, too.

The situation may be diffused, if parties involved are willing to take a step back. At present, however, that doesn’t seem very likely.

And then, of course, there’s Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

At the risk of repeating myself, I think I’d better repeat myself:

Be afraid. Be very afraid.

Top illustration: U.S. President Donald J. Trump and Russia’s President Vladimir Putin. Blogger’s drawing.

 

Britain, oh Britain …

Que sera sera
What ever will be will be
We’re gonna kill Argentines
Que sera sera

My British fellow tourists sang on a Spanish beach in the summer of 1982.

The current situation, as we see it unfold, confirms our deepest fears as we saw the early signs of European disintegration last summer, also proving that the EU is and was the most successful peace project ever seen.

Photo: EU flags flying at half-mast in front of the Brussel Berlaymont building on 22 Match 2016, as if in anticipation of events to come. Photo from the European Commission.

There you have it, then.

Suffice it to say I’m deeply saddened.

EU-flagg på halv stang foran Berlaymont-bygningen i Brussel, 22. mars 2016. Foto fra EU-kommisjonen
EU flags flying at half-mast in front of the Brussel Berlaymont building on 22 Match 2016. Photo from the European Commission.

So terrorism is a thing now, is it?

I hate to admit this, but scary and absorbing as yesterday’s London events may have been (and they were), one should perhaps own up to the fact that one finds oneself in danger, not of terrorism, but of considering acts of same a very usual order of the day, which is why I haven’t brought myself to share any thoughts on last afternoon’s Westminster incident.

Which I find perhaps even scarier than terrorism itself, much as I sympathise with the victims, those affected – and the United Kingdom herself. Not so much because of the scene, or the country in which it all took place, as the realisation that acts of war and terrorism have become very ordinary elements in modern everyday life – extremely mundane.

It may sound a little unsentimental, but therein, perhaps, lies the real threat.

I don’t know.

Illustration: Houses of parliament in Westminster palace. Blogger’s watercolour, by way of Waterlogue.