In a tweet yesterday (please forgive its – Norwegian – language) I put it to my fellow tweeters that the longer an occupying force (Spain) is able to hold an occupied possession (Catalonia, since 1714), the bigger the chance of the occupation’s international approval:

Most of those protesting the statement objected that the occupation has lasted too long for the assertion to hold true.

Also see: Let Catalonia remain occupied, if they so desire

Let Catalonia remain occupied, if they so desire

I like Spain. Not only because I’ve visited several times and quite like it there, but also because I favour unity over separatism, which goes for Spain as for any other country, as well as my beloved homeland, Europe.

However, we should remember that the late generalissimo Francisco Franco remains in high esteem among many a Spaniard. Also his Guardia Civil‘s conduct during the Catalan referendum weeks ago, immediately woke my sympathy for the Catalan separatists – and their demand for independence.

With that said, I find separatism a bad idea, just as I find unity a good one, which includes Catalonia and Spain. Nevertheless, there are a couple of factors that we need to take into account.

What ever the outcome, the international community needs to ensure that democracy prevails. Today we hear claims that the Catalan referendum was illegal, rendering, therefore, the declaration of independence equally illegal, but is that actually the case?

  1. We need to remember that the declaration was made, not by the referendum, illegal or not, but by the legally elected Catalan parliament. Whether or not that decision was based on the referendum, it was indeed made by the Catalan people’s legally elected representatives. As the case always is, when ever democracy is at work.
  2. We’ve heard claims that a new referendum would have to be held throughout Spain, in order to secure the referendum’s legitimacy. To which I should perhaps remark that:
    1. The minute you assign an overwhelming majority the task of deciding a minority’s future, how could you possibly expect an outcome favouring anyone but the majority?
    2. Said majority is an occupant, insofar that Spain invaded, occupied and annexed Catalonia in 1714, rendering Spain a de facto occupying force. Since when did international law condone an occupying country’s right to decide the fate of the occupied?

These are all facts that we need to keep in mind, whether we favour Catalan separatism or not. Personally I do not, but if we are to discuss these matters, I think it’s only fair that we do so on the basis of facts.

Illustration: The Estelada blava. The Catalan flag. Blogger’s own drawing.

While an avid supporter of unity over fragmentation, I also favour democracy over fascitoid regimes.

Enough said, I think.

Good for you, Scotland!

Much as I’d hate to see the UK break up, last year’s tragic Brexit outcome left the Scots with very few options, as I predicted in the immediate wake of the British referendum.

Which is why I’m glad that today First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon announced a second Scottish independence referendum, in order to secure the Scots’ continued EU membership.

While harbouring a strong resentment towards the demolition of the United Kingdom, my distaste for a shattered Europe, in times calling for unity, is even stronger (even if I indeed live in a country sharing Britain’s sentiment).

Ideally the situation calls for a Brexit annullment, but I suppose that’s wishful thinking.

The British isles, comprising three sovereign states: Ireland, Scotland and a united Wales-England (Wangland?), of which only the former two EU members. Bloggers own graphics.
The British isles, comprising three sovereign states: Ireland, Scotland and a united Wales-England (Wangland?), of which only the former two EU members. Bloggers own graphics.

At any rate: Good for you, Scotland!

Illustration: Scottish flag with EU stars. Bloggers drawing.

Oh yes!

The outcome of the Scottish September 2014 independence referendum yielded a 55 percent nay, for which I was relieved.

Following this summer’s Brexit referendum, however, I must admit that a new indy ref was inevitable, and sure enough, this afternoon SNP’s Nicola Sturgeon announced a new independence referendum bill.

This time around, however, I hope they’ll prevail.

The British isles, comprising three sovereign states: Ireland, Scotland and a united Wales-England (Wangland?), of which only the former two EU members. Bloggers own graphics.
The British isles, comprising three sovereign states: Ireland, Scotland and a united Wales-England (Wangland?), of which only the former two EU members. Bloggers own graphics.

Congrats aplenty, UK!

With but a few more votes to count it would appear that yesterday’s referendum yielded approximately 45 percent Aye and 55 percent No votes – for which at least some of Scotland’s neighbours are pleased – among whom this blogger.

What’s interesting, though, is that the support of an independent Scotland may have been larger in Norway than in Scotland herself, for reasons unknown to me, although I can think of two:

  1. The inherent Norwegian disinclination for anything including the word union
  2. An unrealistic hope that Scotland may once again come under Norwegian influence

Don’t get me wrong, I, for one, wouldn’t mind us under the exposure of Scottish influence, in an amicable union, but in all honesty, we’d be equally helpless without the once vast British empire, to which we owe so much.

Granted it may seem as though we have pledged some sort of allegiance to America, but I think that, deep down, we all know that it rightfully belongs with the Brits.

And so we celebrate the outcome of yesterday’s vote, in the hope that we’ll continue to see the Union Jack for ages to come, rather than the above depicted Jack.

IMG_0231.JPG

The best of wishes to our neighbours to the west as they cast their votes over Scottish independence, in the hope – and confidence – that the outcome will be a loud and resounding nay.

You guys do belong together, you know. Undoubtedly we, your neighbours, say no thanks, too. After all we love you just the way you are!

Painting is blogger’s own.