France beware

A huge fan of France’s newly elected and instated president Emmanuel Macron I remain a staunch supporter of his policy and – up until now – suggested measures, saluting his landslide win in the two stages of the recent presidential election.

A victory in today’s legislative election wouldn’t go amiss either, but there’s every reason to sound the alarm should that victory, too, turn out to be overwhelming.

While I lean more in the direction of Macron’s beliefs than in that of any other candidate, I have always been wary of excessive concentration of power.

Before long my French favourite could emerge an absolute and despotic leader (remember, we do seem particularly susceptible to “strong men” these days).

Certainly I salute the French for taking a firm stand against the nationalists, but feel an urge to remind them that dictators come in many shapes and colours – even in the gentlest of appearances.

There’s something very, very scary about democracies with no real opposition.

Photo: France’s president and En Marche! party leader Emmanuel Macron. Photograph from Business France/Flickr

A Britain divided once again normally wouldn’t call for celebration. Nevertheless, in honour of Jeremy Corbyn’s impressive gain, I thought it only befitting to rustle up a fry-up, full monty, save the sausages (I’d have to go to Marks & Spencer in Oslo in order to get hold of such bare necessities, and I live nowhere near that, as you may well know), and, of course, a cuppa – reminiscing the days of Ted Heath and Harold Wilson, now that the two-party system seems safely reinstated.

I will not, however, attempt to deliver an in-depth analysis of the UK post Brexit chaos, now that the Brits have made themselves utterly irrelevant.

P.S. According to the wife it’s salad for me tonight.

Captain SKA: Liar Liar GE2017

P Cast, June 2017

I’m confident that, like the rest of us, many an American is beginning to ask him or herself if maybe enough is actually enough.

If Watergate was unbearable, then surely they cannot tolerate this.

Photo: U.S. President Donald Trump. Detail from official White house portrait.

Godspeed, Macron

You may have noticed a significant drop in posts related to politics and international affairs lately, mostly due to a similarly growing disillusion and dwindling faith in humankind.

If what we perceived as the beacon of western democracy could elect a rambling fascist head of state, then so can France, although I quietly hope they won’t, in spite of Russia’s numerous attempts at preventing the reasonable outcome.

So crossing fingers, but have given up the last flicker of personal engagement entirely.

In a world this dark, there’s precious little you can do, other than pretending it simply isn’t there.

Godspeed, though, M. Emmanuel Macron.

Photo: En Marche! party leader Emmanuel Macron. Photograph from Business France/Flickr.

Dutch election: Far from convincing

As Europe draws a sigh of relief, there’s arguably little cause for rejoice, as Geert Wilder’s Party for Freedom gains four new seats in the Dutch parliament, according to exit polls – not enough to take up government, but an advancement all the same.

Please forgive my inability to applaud the far-right’s progress, undoubtedly to be seen in elections to come, included Europe’s numerous elections this year. Glad the PVV isn’t taking over cabinet, sure, but:

Worried as hell.

I mean, WTF, Netherlanders, you secured the bastards 19 seats (up from 15)! If anything, an encouragement for far-right parties everywhere.

So I reiterate: WTF!?

Photo: Geert Wilders, founder and leader of the Dutch Party for Freedom. Photo from Metropolico.org’s Flickr account.

From what I understand the outcome of the Dutch election remains too close to call, so here’s hoping Geert Wilder’s won’t come out victorious.

A decade or two ago, however, for a far-right party to win even eight or ten percent of the votes would be outrageous. In today’s extreme society not so much.

Makes you sad, doesn’t it?

Any attempt to concentrate power to one out of three branches of government must be opposed vehemently.